The nest is waiting for feathered friends

The Institute of Ecological and Religious Studies has repeatedly informed readers of its informational resources about the ornithological activities of Leonid Pokrytyuk from the city of Berehovo. He built a nest base for storks on a tall tree on the eve of International Birds Day (celebrated annually on April 1st). It was a difficult and even risky job. But a result didn’t take long to make itself. Soon enough, the white storks paid attention to the nesting structure.

In the second decade of April, two pairs of storks flew over the nest, considering the new building. Besides, they didn’t stay long, circled a bit, and flew on. “Making a foundation for a nest is only part of the task because storks are careful birds, they settle better in the old nest than in the new one. And another trick – the edges of the bird’s nest should be whitewashed with lime (imitation of bird droppings) to make it look old, “- says Leonid Pokrytyuk.

According to the ornithologist, the appearance of the old, inhabited nest tells the birds that it is a good place and safe to nest.  “Rainy weather didn’t allow us from arranging the nesting base properly. It is dangerous to climb high on a tree on wet branches. Having chosen the right time, we brought nesting material (thin branches, ivy stalks, hay) and a solution of lime to the top of the chestnut tree,” Leonid told. That’s it! Now the nest is waiting for feathered settlers. By the way, according to popular belief, if white storks live near your house, then be kind and harmonious all year round. Leonid Pokrytyuk and his helpers sincerely expect this, as well as peace for Ukraine.

The event was held in cooperation with the Institute of Ecological and Religious Studies – IERS (headed by Alexander Bokotey) and the German Nature Conservation Union (#NABU), project coordinator Ivan Tymofeiev.

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Informational Service of IERS

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